June 29, 2016
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Education Matters

06/20/16

Dinner With a Friend by Brianna Treanor

Tad stood close in my kitchen offering a loaf of bread in one dirty hand, a trio of mandarin oranges in the other. Other people were there, too. They brought cheap beer, a salad, an appetizer made out of dates wrapped in bacon. “Where did that come from?” I asked, not reaching out to take it. “The shelter,” he said, looking at me with a hopeful expression. With a please-understand-me-like-me-come-along-and-share-with-me expression. “Isn’t that for people with homeless kids and stuff? For people that need it?” A soft worm of resentment settled between his eyes. “They have plenty,” he said. “Nobody eats it all.” He thrust the dark loaf towards my hands and I took it. “Please take it. I just wanted to...

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The Game of Life By Amy Mermelstein

06/20/16

The Game of Life By Amy Mermelstein

Kids don’t allow you the time to sit around having a pity party for yourself for very long. “Do you wanna play?” Danny, my youngest, asked while holding up The Game of Life as I sat on the couch—my torso wrapped in a gigantic compression bandage—feeling like a human cocktail frank minus the soiree. I was busy thinking about the derailment of my meticulously planned summer, which began back in June when my breasts were stretched out like pieces of taffy, slapped between two glass plates and flattened to the thinness of a crêpe. Suspicious findings, second opinions and one lumpectomy later, here I was, lopsided and left in limbo, waiting for biopsy results to determine how the remainder of the summer would play out. Did I want to play The Game of...

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Military Life in Six Parts By Elizabeth McCarve

06/20/16

Military Life in Six Parts By Elizabeth McCarve

I. Orders Before we even get to our next station, we know when we’re going to move. Where to is the eternal question mark. Military families have grown accustomed to the constant uncertainty, and I sometimes feel even more alien than I already am when my civilian friends wonder how I live with it. It’s not a choice, really, I tell them. It’s just how it is. Not knowing where we’re going to go next is as constant in my life as gravity. It’s amazing how people can adjust to any circumstance. Dad receives his orders the spring before we move, and the question mark is laid to rest for a few months, at least. Mom starts to view the house in terms of packing. Everything gets cleaned. I begin to imagine who I’ll meet at our next duty station, what my...

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Icons By Adam Brown

06/20/16

Icons By Adam Brown

On the last day of a former life, I sat near the back right corner of the church and gazed at the cryptic statue of the Blessed Virgin presiding over the burning candles. I took a moment to ponder my situation, real and solid as the marble columns holding the late 19th century stone structure in place. That Susan was leaving an emotionally abusive marriage to be with me should be enough to make a 35-year-old man feel overwhelmed. That I was leaving my vocation three years after ordination as a Catholic priest should be enough to make me sad that my life hadn’t worked out as planned. Instead, I felt nothing. I reached into my pocket and checked my phone. 9:30 a.m. No word from Susan. At the front of the church, the Virgin’s hands extended from her blue cape in open...

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06/20/16

Seven Written Words in Seat 102 By Cara Schultz

There’s supposed to be something that stands out to you at first. That’s what all of the books tell you, anyway. Astoundingly brilliant green eyes that could swallow a galaxy whole, or a smile you can’t get out of your head, or beautiful hair that looks like it was made from the threads of goddesses. Stuff that authors can repeatedly describe when they get lazy. This girl—she didn’t seem to really have any of that stuff, to be honest. She looked kind of ordinary. The first thing that came to mind was that she looked like what the day after a rainstorm would be if it was a person and not, you know, weather. Kind of dreary, like everything was still the same, except a bit damper. Most of her hair was bundled under a gray beanie in a messy bun (ah, yes, messy...

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06/20/16

Among the Stars By Victoria Yang

The first time I saw the stars was when I was 11 years old. ​I had a good grasp of astronomy and had even seen a lunar eclipse.​ But growing up in the city, stars were never something I witnessed firsthand. I would sit cross-legged on my porch before bed, gazing up at the sky, trying to figure out if the bright spots I saw in the sky were helicopters or stars. But then, the dots would flash and move, and I was disappointed yet again. Eventually I rationalized that stars were just one of those things that I was just supposed to accept existed without ever really seeing. I catalogued them next to atoms and DNA in the long list of scientific phenomena that I still held some doubt and wonder about. Nevertheless, my ink sky was comforting to me, an eternal blanket that enveloped my...

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06/20/16

Midway on Mt. Misen By Amy Hesselroth

They didn’t say skinny-dipping, mochi-smashing, and mountain-climbing would be part of the process, but here we were, on a ferry to Miyajima Island in Hiroshima, mentally preparing to do just that. “We” were 20 students representing our country to Japan as part of United States High School Diplomats (USHSD). “They” were the energetic staff of USHSD trying to convince us we would appreciate these experiences once they were over, expecting us to fully immerse ourselves in this new environment. And, yes, that included visiting onsen (the public bath), pounding mochi (rice paste) and hiking Mt. Misen. I was skeptical as to how enjoyable this experience would be. But I felt less anxious each day as I accomplished the tasks I had...

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06/20/16

Locked in Time By Ruslan Gabidoulline

I remember first looking at my new home and feeling a distinct sense of wonder. We were only moving two doors down, but to my 4-year-old mind it was like moving to Mars. The houses were identical, yet I was still struck by the mystery of my new residence. My first priority was moving my vast collection of Legos. I rushed ahead of my father and found the perfect space for it in the basement. The closet was completely empty, or so I thought. I blindly ran in and then felt a sharp pain in my toe. I hopped on one foot, tears welling up in my eyes, clutching my throbbing toe. Luckily, the pain quickly subsided, and I looked down to confront my aggressor. It was a small round combination lock. I picked it up, running my finger along the numbers on the dial. The numbers were worn to a point...

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06/20/16

The Judges

Adult Short Story Contest   Dana Cann is the author of the novel Ghosts of Bergen County from Tin House Books. His short stories have been published in literary journals, including The Sun, The Massachusetts Review and Blackbird. He’s received fellowships from the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation. He lives in Bethesda, where he also teaches fiction workshops at The Writer’s Center. Carmelinda Blagg’s short fiction has been published in a number of journals, including Halfway Down the Stairs, O-Dark-Thirty, The Lindenwood Review and Barrelhouse. Her story “Geographies” was selected to be included in the anthology Best of the Web 2009. She is a past recipient of an Individual Artist Award from the Maryland...

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Week Ahead: Apex Building Redevelopment Details; Police Body Camera Update

06/20/16

Week Ahead: Apex Building Redevelopment Details; Police Body Camera Update

Plus: PGA golf tournament begins in Bethesda; public hearing Tuesday on minimum wage bill

Posted at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments

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About This Blog

Education Matters will discuss the news and issues affecting both public and private schools in Montgomery County. We want to talk about what’s happening inside—and outside—the classroom, who’s making the grade and who isn’t.

Julie Rasicot is a former newspaper reporter and managing editor who’s been writing about education for 25 years. She’s a veteran PTA and classroom volunteer who’s the mother of two girls—an eighth-grader and a fifth-grader—attending MCPS schools. None of that seems to matter, though, when she’s struggling to help her kids with their math homework.

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