Rockville Gun Store Owner Pushes Back Against Smart Gun Protests

The owner decided not to sell the gun after receiving death threats, but stands by his belief that smart guns could be a good thing.


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Screenshot from the video Andy Raymond posted to Facebook.

via Engage Armament on Facebook

A Rockville gun store owner who says he received death threats over a decision to offer a “smart gun” has decided not to sell the gun.

On Thursday night, Andy Raymond, co-owner of Engage Armament, posted a fiery Facebook post, accompanied with a video, that lashed out against protestors who he says have made death threats against him, his family and even his dog.

The gun at the center of the debate, an Armatix iP1 handgun, features electronic chips that communicate with a watch that can be bought separately. Without the watch, the gun cannot be fired.

In the video, Raymond, who sits in front of a backdrop of assault rifles with a bottle of liquor on the counter, explains why he initially decided to offer the gun.

“If you’re pro-gun, does it matter what kind of gun a person has?” asked Raymond. “If the person is a fence-sitter when it comes to gun rights, they’re sitting there saying ‘I want a gun to go to the range, to just use it at the range. I don’t want it for home defense, or anything like that, but I most certainly don’t want my kids to have access to it, ever’ then this gun would have worked for those people.”

On Friday, Raymond said in an interview he stands by this principle, and that last night he was up until 2:30 a.m. talking to protestors and others about the issue.

“Then I realized I can’t sleep here at the shop because I was afraid someone would throw a Molotov cocktail through window,” Raymond said.

In the video Raymond becomes passionate when talking about the death threats. He says, “If you’re going to kill somebody, shoot the politicians who make these f…..g laws… Take them out in the street and gun them the f..k down… there’s a f…..g reason we got these things… and that’s to defend our freedom.”

On Friday, Raymond toned down the rhetoric, saying about the video, “I guess I should take it down, but now it’s all over the place. My principle is it’s not me, it’s not anybody else, it’s the politicians who make these laws, you should direct your hostility towards them.”

Raymond confirmed Friday his shop will not offer the gun. “I cant have people burn down my shop,” he said.

The idea of a “smart gun” caused an uproar among gun advocates who fear the technology will be mandated by the government.

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